Slight Snow-A-Long Delay

J. Wecker Frisch

Hello Everyone.

We have been hearing a lot of excitement surrounding the

Sweet Snow-A-Long!

And we are equally excited and thrilled to be bringing this classic fabric collection with our partners at Riley Blake Designs and FUN project to all of you!!

Please note the new “shooting for” date:

The Sweet Snow-A-Long originally scheduled to begin on July 23rd will now start on July 30th.

Patterns (P149)-Sweet Snow-A-Long) will be ready in the nick of time, for this highly anticipated event!

Meanwhile, if you’re shopping!

The REVISED Fabric Requirements and Supplies List:

Sweet Snow-A-Long Update

The above items are available in Quilt Shops now.

We are sorry for the delay and are grateful for your understanding and patience. We want to be sure that everyone is able to gain access to the fabric and pattern.

So, hang on just a bit longer please.

Thanks again for all of You who have been supporting the Snow Sweet fabric collection, it has been amazing!

Sweet Snow-A-Long

Announcing,

SWEET SNOW-A-LONG

July 23rd

made with

SNOW SWEET

fabrics from Riley Blake Designs!

Follow us here at JOY STUDIO for each step over five weeks to make this delightful and delicious quilt top.

Patterns and fabric are shipping now so check with your favorite shop for arrival times. MANY shops have ordered this so patterns, kits and fabric should be widely available.

If your local is still closed check the on line shops. Search Snow Sweet fabric and Sweet Snow-A-Long.

J. Wecker Frisch

Anyone can make this. We know because WE DID!! Lol And as you know, we are still new at this. I hope you can join us to make this really fun snowy quilt and cool off your summer!!!

Hat Shop SAL Wrap

Hat Shop Sew-A-Long, last post.

Adding your borders is all that is left to do!

This can be done in a couple of different ways however, I will only be describing how I actually, chose to finish this quilt.

Borders.

First up, the inner 1″ (finish size) black border. Make sure that your window blocks are squared up by trimming, measuring and placing your tracings over them before you add this border. Pay special attention to you last row of blocks so that all of the items will appear to be sitting on the bottom shelf of your window. It was necessary for me to trim mine about 1/2″. Then pin and sew with your 1/4″ seam.

Secondly sew on your gray borders to three sides. Top, right and left. I cut them 2″ for an inch and a half finish.

 

Bottom border.

Because I did not want to stitch around the appliquéd bricks after the borders were added to the quilt top, I simply strip pieced both of the borders together to treat the entire unit as the bottom border. Then I arranged the bricks (omitting one) making up the window sill approximately 1/4″ or so apart, evenly to fit directly under the black inner border. When I was satisfied with the placement, I fused the bricks to the gray and black unit, overlapping the seam slightly. This made stitching down the bricks much easier to manage than turning the entire quilt. I did however, stray from the pattern a bit. As you can see, the brick window ledge was confined to the bottom border only. You can choose to add two more bricks, one on each end after you add your side borders. I plan to do this as I show in the last photo in the segment below.

If you made it through the Hat Shop SAL, be proud of yourself! I was, and also quite surprised. This was a very intimidating challenge for me but I pushed through and learned much by making this project. Now my top is off to the quilter and I will share the finished piece with you soon.

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From ART to APPLIQUÉ.

Thanks for following and hopefully, sewing-a-long.

So long, for now.

 

Hat Shop Sew-A-Long, Wk 3

Again welcome to the Hat Shop Sew-A-Long!

Picking up from last week,

Sewing the details.

As I shared in week two, if you want to add decorative stitching and other trims to enhance each block, you may want to do that before piecing all four blocks together for easier turning.  Whether you already assembled your top row before placing the text or not, either way is OK.  I still have only fused and stitched down the red hat pieces. We will be stitching the remaining eight applique blocks in their entirety before assembling each row.


Pattern correction, derby wooden hat form applique should be extended to the hat brim, as if to appear going up into the hat.  I marked the pattern with red dashed lines in the photo below.  Also, the bottom of the rose needs to move up to be even with the hat band also indicated with red dashed lines.  See third photo:

This week, fusing row 2.

Lining up the vertical stripes.

If you have a pieced background the most important thing to check in starting row 2 is matching up your vertical stripes!  So, before pinning or fusing, match your stripes using your traced block patterns described in week 2, Making an appliqué placement door. Most likely, your stripes will not match the patterns stripes exactly. Mine did not, but were close. As long as you keep the second and third row consistent with your blocks in the previous row, then placement should match up. See below that my blue stripes are slightly to the left of the traced sheet in all three rows/photos. Next we will be using our tracings and placement door, for each of the four blocks in row 2, repeating the same steps as we did in row 1.

Block 1, Row 1

 

Block 1, Row 2

 

Block 1, Row 3

Applique fusing sequence.

The best way to determine what is fused first is by laying out all of your appliqué pieces on their corresponding blocks, carefully checking with your pattern cover and technical illustration.  Much like the red hat described in week 2, the majority of the hats are fused in a similar order.

For example the derby:

vertical stand post,

stand base,

derby,

hat form,

band,

leaves,

and then the rose.

Hat number 3

I chose to use Couturiere Parisenne from Riley Blake Designs, red bold text rather than attempting the red stripes on hat three with my limited sewing experience.  Letting the fabric do the work for me while still offering a similar visual impact was a lot less intimidating for me, a novice.

Secondly, we used an interfacing in between the applique and the fusible web to help hide the background for all of the white hats.  We used Pellon 911FFW1.  As you can see, my stripes are still visible so you may want to choose something heavier for a total mask.

Appliqué Fabric Option

 

Once everything is fused in row two, you can begin the decorative stitching. Take your time, have fun. This part is where you can really get creative! Again it’s always a good idea with fusibles to at least secure your appliqué with some stitching.

We will plan to assemble all blocks after rows one, two and three are fused and sewn down.

Please forgive me, we did not forget last Saturday’s giveaway, only postponed. We’ll keep you posted.

Stay tuned to Instagram and Facebook for additional news and hat shots.

Hat Shop Sew-A-Along, Wk 1

Hat Shop Sew-A-Long begins today!

What better way to start off than with a blog follower’s GIVEAWAY! We have a bonus hat plus some fun sewing related add on-s for this project that were included in the original art but are also cute stand alone-s. Oh, and did I mention, we are including some of my new fabric fat quarters to that!! Chances are if you are participating in this Sew-A-Long, you are already following here, on the Joy (blog) Journal. If not, simply click on the subscribe button above right if you would like to enter for a chance to win the bonus pattern. Follow us on Instagram too for another chance with a comment tagging a friend. @jweckerfrisch You can still enter by subscribing even if you are not participating in the SAL.

 

As you read in the previous announcement post, I am sharing my art that we have translated to appliqué design. Please know that I am not a qualified expert in sewing technique and/or quilt assembly. I wanted to remind everyone of this up front. This is my first time making the project also, together with you. It is the 5th quilt I have pieced! One of them was “doll” size too so, I’m not sure that one even counts. The encouraging news is, that even a beginner like me can make these charming appliqué blocks and have fun.

 

Raw edge fused appliqué is the method that works best for my very detailed images and one I am most comfortable executing. Our pattern was designed to work with this technique only, although you can certainly add an allowance to create turned appliqué if you choose. I am still learning so please feel free to comment any tips, questions, or critiques below or email to janet@greatjoystudio.com. I’ll do my best to address them all.

OK, let’s get started!

We will be making the 12 blocks that make up the window background in the main body of the quilt this week. First decide if you want a striped or solid background. We chose to make a striped background using Couturiere Parisienne light blue text (#C8850-BLUE) and Confetti Cottons vintage white (#C120), both from our fabric partner, Riley Blake Designs. As indicated on the pattern, you will be cutting equal number of 2.5″ x 18″ (or longer) strips from both, for a 2″ x 17″ finished size, 1/4″ seam allowance. If you choose a directional fabric as we did, you will be cutting your strips parallel to the selvage.

Some of the blocks begin with a light strip and others begin with a blue and in several blocks, the stripes overlap! As you can see in the photos below, we flipped the pattern over and taped all four blocks in the top row together, matching the horizontal dashed seam lines, to our window in order to view the pattern lines as they will appear. Then we marked the darker stripes with a highlighter for an easier visual reference. The top row then will be your guide as you work vertically for the next two rows of blocks.

Strip Background Piecing Tip:

I learned the hard way that you will want to stitch each of the strips together from alternate ends of your block. As you can see, I started each strip at the top and my first 3 blocks had a distinct curve to them.

Once you have all of your blocks made, you you are ready to start on you appliqué pieces.

Choosing Fabrics

Pattern correction, not listed is yellow swirl (#C8945-Yellow). You will need a fat eight.

On the back of your pattern in fabric requirements is a list of Riley Black Designs fabrics used for each hat as they appear top to bottom, left to right. You can also reference the picture (worth a thousand words) on the front cover. Our Painter’s Palette Collection  from Riley Blake Designs include a wide range of colors, values and artful textures to create from when you want to achieve an interesting watercolor look. I plan to keep plenty on hand to use with former and future projects.

Making Your Raw Edge Fusible Apliqué Pieces

Begin by tracing your appliqué pieces onto your choice of fusible web product. We used Pellon 800. The pattern is already in mirror image so trace each appliqué piece from the printed side of your pattern. With so many similar pieces, it is very important to mark each one with a system you will remember. We chose to use the row and block numbers. Once traced, rough cut your fusible pieces.

Organize them on the appropriate block. and you are now ready to fuse!

See you next Wednesday for further fusing instructions.