Fabric Journal, Week 2

Hello!

I hope that you enjoyed making tags and faux stamps along with gathering any vintage sewing inspired items that you want to incorporate into your journal. Moving along – This week I made a few heavy canvas pocket pages (signatures), to test and started on some quilted pages (signatures) as well.

The featured fabric throughout the project will be She Who Sews (Best of) and the She Who Sews Home Dec fabrics from Riley Blake Designs. SWSs Home are due to deliver in August. So, check with your quilt shop for availability. This fabric is sew pretty!

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1) Blank canvas pages.

Again I had this canvas on hand and decided to begin with these first. I cut them using a rotary cutter and straight edge on two sides to fit my notebook but left the fringed edges for interest. I also reinforced the inside edges with a one inch strip that will be hole punched, just for extra support. I then used up the scraps for my pockets.

If you want to sew anything on your pockets, do before attaching them to your page. I added a few of the spool stamps and buttons but may decide to stamp or paint some details too.

2) Quilted Pages with She Who Sews.

For my first quilted one I chose She Who Sews Home Dec shears fabric from Riley Blake Designs. This collection is full of vintage sew-y motifs which are perfect for a fabric/sew journal! It will deliver in August so check with your quilt shop for availability.

Page base is Natural Linen cut a half inch larger than your fusible batting and your top (shears) fabric, on all four sides. Sandwich the three layers in that order and pin in place if your batting is not fusible. I only gave a light press to adhere the fabrics where I wanted them to be and then began to quilt around each of the images.

I used an off white thread to blend into the fabric. After some light quilting I used a zigzag stitch on a fairly wide setting around the edges of the top fabric. I like the sketchy appearance of raw fabric edges and a variety of stitches but you could turn and top stitch if you prefer. I have not decided yet if I will fringe my linen edges or simply trim them. My pocket will be added just as the previous canvas pages. I am still deciding what fabric to use however, and how deep to make the pockets. Maybe matching the print would be nice. Any thoughts?

Continue making as many pocket pages as you think you’ll need. By next week I hope to have several and then we can really get creative! Sound good?!!

Meanwhile get daily updates on Instagram and Facebook.

 

Thanks for visiting, see you next week.

 

Fabric Journal, Week 1

Welcome!

I am so glad that you could join us for this She Who Sews ‘Fabric Journal’ intro.

Like most of you, I have been admiring the art of journal and book making for some time. Smash books, junk journals, for scrap, tags, pockets etc., always draw me in to take a closer look. So, I finally worked this topic into my design schedule and an inspiring NEW fabric collection!

Stay Tuned for, “Art Journal” from Riley Blake Designs.

Over the next few weeks I will be sharing the process that I followed for my version and first attempt at this favorite pastime. So far mine is going in a direction of vintage sewing keepsakes and collected items, BIG organizer notebook for personal use. My thought, to have everything in one easy to find, easy to store place, artfully and aesthetically pleasing.

For this project I will be using She Who Sews, Best of (in stores) and She Who Sews HOME (August delivery) as well as Linen from Riley Blake Designs.

1) My first step was to dive into these cute fabrics! So making a few faux stamps and oversized cargo tags seemed an easy and fun way to get started for journal content. Spool stamps using the toss fabrics plus white and natural linen was the obvious choice. I fused the selected fabrics (for front) to some linen and scrap fabrics (for backing) on hand to give both a bit of weight. Once fused I fussy cut the spools apart. To achieve faux postage I then stamped them randomly. You could freehand the postal details using Micron permanent markers if you don’t have stamping supplies.

Next I fused the spool fabric to a larger size piece of backing fabric and trimmed with a pinked rotary blade. Pinking shears will work fine too. Stitching is another great touch to do at this stage or later directly to your journal page. Your choice.

I used the She Who Sews Border Stripe characters to create some oversized (pocket) tags. I cut the characters apart in this case and fused to my long strips of linen scraps. A binding ruler was the perfect tool to cut the tag corners. I am still looking for the right tool to punch the top hole but will probably hand cut with sharp scissors or simply add a button.

Note: As you can see below my tags are a bit too flexible so sandwiching with an interfacing or heavier fusible product can offer a stiffer tag. I intended these to be pocket tags and did not want to add too many layers so, we’ll see how this will work out. This step depends on your desired result.

2) For my journal/book base, I decided to use something that I already had rather than to begin a cover from scratch.  This saved time and besides that I had acquired so many cool old albums, purchased art journals and notebooks that it seamed a good idea to utilize at least one of them for this project. I chose this chunky green commercial three ring notebook and will concentrate on making my pages only. Eventually, personalizing the cover could be a good plan.

3) While gathering supplies from around the studio I was reminded of some heavy canvas (bank?!) bags that I purchased somewhere, years ago. These will be perfect as pocket pages to hold a lot of the goods. Anything will do for the page base and a blank canvas for adding the fun fabrics was my initial thought. Moving forward, I am realizing that this work in progress is sure to evolve but any variation of course, is the fun part!

A look back –

I first tried my hand at constructing a simple cloth style artful book with a few pages, pockets and added materials best I knew how and presented in our QM booth 2019. This Scary Book uses Costume Makers Ball fabric from Riley Blake Designs and was intended as a fun decoration for the Fall festivities and it was FUN to make! I really enjoyed but confess, was winging it all the way. I began another the following year using Goose Tales but have not yet completed. Time is my typical obstacle, then again the life interruption in 2020 took away the (Quilt Market) incentive which didn’t help my motivation.

However, I have NEW inspiration for fabric and mixed media journal making and will be sharing on

Instagram and Facebook.

Follow us there for the latest and meanwhile, keep making!!

See you next week.

Follow the Blue Bird

Celebrating,

the launch of

Riley Blake Designs

first low volume Designer Collection,

Hush Hush!

Excited,

to be the first designer to showcase our

“Follow the Blue Bird”

original project.

 Using our favorite fusible applique technique, and the free pattern which can be found on RBD’s website, we created a Birdhouse Bunting!! Our bunting features Riley Blake Designs fabrics from Hush Hush, Painters Watercolor Swirl, and Hungry Animal Alphabet. Basic applique instructions are written below:

 

General Instructions for Fusible Applique:

  • Refer to photos for fabric choices/placement
  • Download the template sheets (using the link bottom of this post) to create your bunting flags by tracing onto paper backing of fusible web. Rough cut around each.
  • Fuse according to the product instructions on wrong side of selected fabrics.
  • Cut out the applique pieces on the drawn line, cool and remove paper backing.
  • Fuse applique pieces onto the background blocks according to fusible web directions.
  • Once all of your flags are fused you can secure your applique and/or further embellish with decorative stitching.

First, trace your pieces onto the paper side of your fusible product then fuse to wrong side of fabrics and cut out your blue bird pieces. I found this was helpful to do first to help in choosing my Hush Hush background fabrics.

 Next, choose your fabrics.

Print out your two sheets for the bunting flag using the link at bottom of the page. Assemble with tape to form half of the flag and use this template to make the full pattern image on any craft paper of your choosing. Once you have this you will also trace the various pieces on to the paper side of your fusible product and cut out.

You can chose to fuse backing fabric to your bunting flag for a flat result as we did here or layer with batting before attaching backing fabric.

We always make a tracing paper ‘door’ to enable accurate appliqué placement as shown in the photos above. Pinning to the top of your pressing mat makes it easy to flip open and closed to nudge the pieces where they go.

The bunting flag pattern can be used to piece your top and bottom fabrics which form your birdhouse shape or fuse them as we show here. These are first, then fuse scallops, then (tape measure fabric) trim. Next we fused the birdhouse hole (black Swirl fabric) and last assembled our blue bird.

Now, for the fun part, decorative sewing!

You can see our Birdhouse Bunting finish photos on Instagram and/or Facebook later today and throughout the week.

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We also used Hush Hush fabrics as the background for a Maple Leaf nine patch table top quilt, made with Painter’s Watercolor Swirl fabrics. A perfect pairing with our Fall Leaves Place Card project and HERE, that we created with Painters Palette fabrics.

Follow me on Instagram at @jweckerfrisch and Facebook for more.

 

Birdhouse Bunting

Snowman Sew Along with All About Christmas: Wk 3 – Sewing your Appliqué Blocks

Welcome

to the last week of our mini

Snowman Sew Along

with All About Christmas quilt &

fabric from Riley Blake Designs.

By this time you have your three snowmen blocks completely fused and are ready to sew. If not, as always continue at your own pace. The only thing we have left to complete these blocks now is to secure the appliqué designs to the background fabrics and add any decorative stitching. There are many stitches and styles you can use to do this and the choice is entirely yours, you’re the maker!

I am most comfortable using one of my (basic Pfaff) machine’s options that is most like a blanket stitch to outline and secure my appliqué pieces to my background fabrics. I started with the large white pieces first. These are a bit stiff since we used an extra layer of interfacing and your appliqué pieces can pull up with handling so be careful to get them well fused. If this happens however, before you are ready to sew simply press over them again to reactivate the fusible glue. If you use this type of stitch you want to lay your needle right beside your appliqué fabric edge close as you can for the running stitches.

I also chose the same color thread that best matched my fabrics or close as I had on hand. I used 50 weight cotton Aurifil. Both of these choices (blanket stitch and same color thread) seam to make up for any imperfections due to my beginner sewing skills. Of course you can go with any style such as free motion or any number of decorative stitching that you like.

I continued by sewing the next largest pieces first red, then yellow, green and so on until I finished stitching around all of the smaller pieces.

For my green, I only had a lime shade but I think this helped to distinguish the tree branches against the two darker fabrics.

Remember! These blocks still have to be quilted so, hold off on any 3-D embellishments like buttons or charms, etc. Which explains the blank look on our snowmen faces. Lol!  I actually have tiny black buttons for his eyes and mouth and can’t wait to see them finished. 😉

We will post our finished blocks on Instagram and Facebook so, if you want to see our updates and the rest of our blocks in this quilt, plus anything new, you can follow us here:

IG – J Wecker Frisch

FB – Joy Studio News

Happy sewing and a sincere thanks for joining our snowman fun!

Below is our block inspiration.

Original watercolor by J Wecker Frisch

 

Snowman Sew Along with All About Christmas: Week 2 – Raw Edge Fusible Appliqué

Hello again!

Is everyone ready to move on to the

All About Christmas quilt

SNOWMEN?

Good. Let’s get started!

You should already have your three background snowflake fabrics cut and set aside to receive the snowman appliqué items per instructions.

So, first thing is to tape your snowmen template sheets together. There are six sheets per snowman included in your pattern. You will want to take a little time with this to match up registration marks and get them squared up to the correct block size.

Now you’re ready to begin tracing the individual shapes of each item in the snowman image onto your fusible web products. We like using a fine tip Sharpie in any color however, using a different color for each block will make organizing your fusible pieces much easier to access readily. The All About Christmas quilt pattern templates are already in reverse so trace with template sheets, printed side up, on the paper side of you fusible products. Again, just as in the fabric cutting suggestions last week, place and trace your largest glue pieces first to assure you will have enough of the fusible to complete this process.

Next begin laying out all of your smaller appliqué pieces in the remaining areas where they fit best for utilizing all of the fusible materials. We strongly suggest numbering the pieces too as you go. This will come in handy later when you begin to arrange and fuse the difficult to recognize pieces on your background fabric blocks. Once all of your fusible web pieces have been drawn, rough cut them out and organize by block.

Side Note: You will be tracing your Riley White snowman and snowy ground twice, first on your chosen fusible web product and a second time on a lightweight fusible interfacing product. We use Pellon Fusible 911FFW1 Featherweight. This will help to block the fabric underneath from showing through your white appliqué fabrics. You may want to use this method for the yellow fabrics in your piece also. Layering sequence when you are ready to fuse these, will be wrong side of appliqué fabric to interfacing, that unit to fusible web and then onto background fabric in the indicated order. You will end up with a heavier/thicker appliqué unit.

Next, making your raw-edge appliqué pieces.

Refer to the pattern cover art to begin fusing the correct, numbered fusible web pieces to their corresponding fabrics, according to the manufacturers directions. After all of the appliqué pieces are fused, you can cut them out accurately with a good sharp pair of scissors. I do not use my ‘for fabric only’ scissors for this but rather a specified favorite. We recommend letting all of your appliqué pieces cool completely before attempting to remove the paper backing. If time allows we prefer waiting overnight but a couple of hours may be enough. Another tip for removing the paper is to score a line with anything sharp but not enough to cut through the fabric, anywhere on the paper side of your fused appliqué. Then begin peeling the backing paper away from the fabric using the scored line as a stating point. This will help to prevent fraying your fabric edges.

Now, building the snowman blocks!

After all of the paper is removed from your appliqué pieces, you are ready to arrange and place them in your snowman blocks. The numbers on each snowman template indicate which piece is the next to be fused. As stated in last week’s post, placement is best achieved using a placement sheet. Since you cannot view the template sheet through the background fabrics we like tracing the template onto a sheet of ordinary tracing paper to make a placement sheet ‘door’. Explained last week here and shown below.

You can see in the above phoyo that we opted to cut out the small snowman (block 3) both in cotton and batting to offer a little extra pouf . This is your preference.

Having fun yet?

I like the cutting and fusing best myself, but next week we are

READY to SEW!

Show us your progress as you follow and tag me on Instagram @jweckerfrisch

and please use #allaboutchristmasfabric to share your photos.

I would enjoy hearing from you!